Date   

Community response - Palestine, Myanmar, South Sudan and Kenya

nils carstensen
 

Dear colleagues,
Thanks to all of you who have sent updates and resources relevant to community-responses to the Covid-19 crisis – in its many manifestations.
 
From the Palestinian West Bank, colleagues at EJ_YMCA have shared a number of inspiring examples, which we have summarised here:
In all the communities where we have worked, village level, pre-existing Protection Groups (PG) have formed subgroups called "emergency groups". This group mainly consists of members of the PG who are in good health conditions (members who are not sick, members who do not have chronic illnesses and members who are less vulnerable to the virus).  The emergency groups oversee virus prevention mechanisms in their communities as well as implement protection initiatives while coordinating with the EJ-YMCA and relevant governmental institutions. In two of these communities, villagers were able to join the central emergency groups formed by municipalities of that area.
 
One Emergency Group was supplied with a small community cash grant (aprox. 700USD) cash, which enabled them to purchase some necessary sanitizers and hygienic supplies for the village. In 6 villages groups gather information on the number of individuals who work in Israel and Israeli settlements (where the number of Covid19 cases has been much higher than in Palestine. Gathering this data has enabled the emergency groups to target specific families and individuals and raise their awareness regarding the importance of self-quarantine once these individuals are back in the village. The groups also shared with these families (and on the communities' Facebook groups) relevant prevention material on Covid19 and the Ministry of Health's Covid19 hotlines in case anyone had further questions and for instance information on where to get tested if relevant. In two villages, community members created "friendly checkpoints" to monitor the entrances to their village encouraging individuals who returned from Israel to contacts the relevant authorities and if needed to be put in quarantine.
 
In three villages, the emergency groups succeeded having all public spaces in the villages sanitized by governmental institutions. In some villages, the emergency groups have conducted a rapid needs assessment. Having established the primary needs for the most vulnerable families, they were able to gather contributions from other village members – and in some cases coordinate with NGOs - to provide assistance to address some of the specific needs of particularly affected families with - including basic food/ hygienic supplies. In one village, teachers and students at the local school conducted an awareness campaign addressed at students and parents to encourage the participation in online education. Some families were assisted with internet connections in their homes. In the same village, the emergency group has a sub-committee with only female member. This committee was formed in coordination with the Ministry of Woman Affairs. The role of this committee is to focus on women and young women's needs and priorities.
 
Lastly, EJ-YMCA reports have they have worked with the Ministry of Agriculture to provide villages with seeds and seedlings so that families would be able to grow their own vegetables in their gardens now that movement is restricted, vegetable trucks are no longer passing by and the income and purchasing power of many families have been significantly reduced due to lock down restrictions.

In the Frontier Myanmar, Kyaw Lin Htoon reports how “IDPs being left behind in the response to COVID-19”. The article also describes the contradicting demands experienced by IDPs as a result of government restrictions, lock down – and the need to feed your family:

Salai Tun Tan, one of around 500 people living in a camp in Mee Zar village in Paletwa Township, said food was running low because conflict made travel almost impossible. “We are getting rice from nearby villages and then we hunt for animals in the jungle, and collect vegetables and mushrooms,” he said. “Every day we nominate three to five men to go out to look for food. ”Hunting and foraging were dangerous because of the conflict, he added, but the IDPs had no choice. “Of course, we are afraid of the fighting, but what can we do?” He said that amid the conflict few people in the camps were giving much thought to COVID-19, and they had not yet received any information about the disease from the government or other actors. “I think the disease can’t reach us,” he said, “since we are surrounded by jungles, mountains and an active conflict.”

The Rift Valley Institute has just circulated a guidance paper on covid-19 responses in South Sudan. It includes a strong emphasis on community consultations  - and adaptation of guidance to local realities. Please find it attached to this e-mail.

Rounding of this update in Kenya, the Guardian recently carried this story: How a 'coronavirus hairstyle' is helping raise awareness in east Africa. It’s all about how kids and hairdressers are using an affordable haircut with braided spikes that echo virus’s shape to 1) help parents save money, 2) keep hairdressers make a modest but vital vital income and – not least - 3) send a vital message to a more grown up but possibly less aware audience. If nothing else just enjoy the pictures and the hairstyle.

 

Please keep sharing examples by directly by simply answering to this e-mail – or send them to me at: nic@...

 

All the best

nils



nils carstensen
Local to Global Protection
E-mail: nic@...





Re: Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings

Chris Ball
 

Hi All,

This document, only published a couple of weeks ago, only appears to be in English at the moment. The Spanish version I developed using online translation (so please excuse the errors). I could also online translate to French if there is interest?

Chris

On Thu, 14 May 2020 at 09:13, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Hi all,

Thanks to Chris who just shared this WHO resource on covid-19 called"Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings Remotely and i-person". Chris send it with this comment:


Have you seen this document? It’s actually quite hard to find but in my opinion is the best resource on CV19 RCCE and includes a lot of community-based/led initiatives.

 

This is the link to the original English version: https://www.thecompassforsbc.org/sites/default/files/strengthening_tools/WHO_CETipsCovid19_0.pdf


Chris attached a Spanish version to this e-mail. I suspect that you may find French and/or Arabic versions as well if you search for it.


All the best

nils

--

Warm regards,

Chris Ball

DRR Advisor

UK Mobile: 0044 7896 719 635

Global Mobile: 0044 7452 383 872

Diakonie Katastrophenhilfe


Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings

Nils Carstensen
 


Hi all,

Thanks to Chris who just shared this WHO resource on covid-19 called"Tips for Engaging Communities during COVID-19 in Low-Resource Settings Remotely and i-person". Chris send it with this comment:


Have you seen this document? It’s actually quite hard to find but in my opinion is the best resource on CV19 RCCE and includes a lot of community-based/led initiatives.

 

This is the link to the original English version: https://www.thecompassforsbc.org/sites/default/files/strengthening_tools/WHO_CETipsCovid19_0.pdf


Chris attached a Spanish version to this e-mail. I suspect that you may find French and/or Arabic versions as well if you search for it.


All the best

nils


Updates from Somalia, Nigeria + TODAY: East Africa panel discussion: Access: ways to listen and prioritise' - next Monday (May 4th), at 4:00 PM

Nils Carstensen
 

D
Dear all,
With short notice please find details below of an OCHA moderated online regional discussion based on among other the attached NRC report on community-level perceptions and understanding of Covid-19 in Somalia.
An informative read also for people working in other countries.

Find the report attached - and details for this Monday afternoon's (4 pm East Africa) online discussion at the very bottom of this e-mail.

To put the report from Somalia in perspective, the Guardian on Saturday carried the story below on a suspected raise in death due to corona in Somalia. Due to the scarcity of firm medical data, the story is informed by reports from undertakers and grave diggers in Mogadishu reporting a significant spike in burials of elderly men. Read more here https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/02/somali-medics-report-rapid-rise-in-deaths-as-covid-19-fears-grow?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

From Nigeria's largest city, Lagos, this story tells of how (mostly middle- and upper-middle-class) professionals are reaching out with food and other items to less fortunate citizens during the Covid-crisis:
Greetings
nils


Dear colleagues

OCHA ROSEA is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

 

Topic: Access Regional Discussion - 'Access: ways to listen and prioritise'.

Time: May 4, 2020 16:00 Nairobi

 

Join Zoom Meeting

https://zoom.us/j/92174471780

 

Meeting ID: 921 7447 1780

Speakers include:

  • NRC, introducing its research paper (attached) based on a survey run in Somalia to understand what communities knew about Covid-19, where they perceived risks, how they received information, and what they most needed. Research highlights that: ‘Many respondents demonstrated an awareness of the incongruity between prevention and control measures and local realities, where congestion, a lack of water and hygiene facilities and widespread dependence on daily wage labour significantly limit the capacity of communities to heed prevailing guidance. Such considerations must be taken into account in all humanitarian and development response planning in Somalia, where social isolation and handwashing messages alone are insufficient to meaningfully addressing community needs and concerns.'
  • Nexus (a group of 9 Somali civil society organisations), talking of their latest work on messaging and information campaigns
  • Adeso, presenting their work on cash in Somalia
  • Africa’s Voices , introducing its ‘rapid diagnostic’ to listen to communities. In a recent survey conducted in Somalia, AV found that: ‘Health and behavioural change communication needs to be highly context relevant: free of jargon, empathetic, in local language and speech forms, and tailored to local socio-cultural identities and norm-change models. It has to start with listening to Somalis.’ Available at https://www.africasvoices.org/case-studies/somali-views-in-the-early-days-of-covid-19-a-rapid-diagnostic/

I also share this link to this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ that lays out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries. And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection.  

 

It is an open discussion. Please tell your colleagues.

 

Have a nice weekend.

 

Bene


Somalia: Listener survey on covid-19 responses

nils carstensen
 

… and from Somalia, Africa’s Voices (see link below) has a story on a recent survey in Somalia on what the listeners of Radio Imaqal saw as most important for Covid-19 responses:

‘Dear Imaqal Listener, your voice is important for the response to COVID19. What are your thoughts on Coronavirus?’
This message was sent out to 51,000 recipients and responses were collected over the course of a weekend, 3-5 April 2020. 7,747 responded (approximately 15%) with over 18,000 SMS received.
The diagnostic sample is self-selecting, and skewed towards urban and those recently displaced (also youth), but as these are populations of concern, this is still deeply valuable information.
KEY HEADLINE FINDINGS
  • Asked for their thoughts on COVID-19 Somali respondents spoke less from a health than from a religious hope/practice standpoint.
  • Respondents fall into two broad camps: Those invoking religious hope, practice and guidance as the right way forward (38.7%); those invoking community action aligned to expert/government advice with a “call for right practice” (34.1%).
  • The religion frame grows more salient with increasing age; splits evenly between (passive) fate/hope/trust in Allah and (active) devoutness, prayer, offering.
  • Younger age groups (notably females) are more likely to advocate for following expert/government advice on right practices.
  • Over 1 in 10 respondents expressed thoughts on COVID-19 that involve rumour, stigma or misinformation (12.2%). Over 75% of these respondents expressed negative stigma: hostility, anger or resentment. A message denying coronavirus was over twice as likely to come from a male than a female.
  • Recently displaced were significantly more likely to express such thoughts than those who were not. In Banadir (Mogadishu area), recently displaced were twice more likely than host community respondents to express rumour, stigma or misinformation
  • Rumour, stigma or misinformation were also more likely from respondents from more insecure areas (due to Al-Shabaab threat) such as Bay and Lower Juba than from Banadir.
Find more detail of the survey here:


Villagers supporting urban dwellers in Chiang Mai, Thailand

nils carstensen
 

Dear all,

Below please find an interesting example of cooperation between Karen villagers, the Thai military and urban citizens in Chiang Mai – all shared by good colleagues in Thailand.

Villagers supporting urban dwellers in Chiang Mai, Thailand

In the face of the Covid-19 global pandemic, Pwo Karen villagers recently contacted the Thai military with a request to share their harvest with residents of Chiang Mai as a way to help in the relief effort. On Wednesday, 29 April 2020, thousands of individual bags of organic rice, vegetables, fruit, and vitamins (smile) carefully prepared by the Karen were transported in a large black military truck to a square across the road from the Chiang Mai Thai military barracks. Beginning in the late afternoon, 30 villagers, men and women, young and old, served food for several hours to more than 1,000 Chiang Mai citizens, who, destitute by the pandemic, had lined up in the park for hours. 

It was an unforgettably experience to see the Pwo Karen villagers, beautifully dressed in their traditional hand-woven clothing, stretching out their arms with the fruits of the earth and the fruits of their labor. The efforts of these Karen, who are often not fully recognized as Thai citizens, united together diverse peoples—Chiang Mai residents, Thai soldiers, monks, and Karen villagers—in a moment of compassion, a gesture of humanity.

And for those interested, this US website is trying to capture community responses globally – but so far with a majority of examples originating out of the US:
https://storytracker.solutionsjournalism.org/search?q%5Bissue_areas%5D%5B0%5D%5Bvalue%5D=418&q%5Bissue_areas%5D%5B0%5D%5Blevel%5D=1&q%5Bissue_areas%5D%5B0%5D%5BparentId%5D=&q%5Bissue_areas%5D%5B0%5D%5Blevel1Id%5D=&q%5Bfull_text_on%5D=false
 

Greetings - Ramadan Kareem to all

nils


Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Simone Di Vicenz
 

HI all,

thanks Nils for starting this conversation.
i found this interesting website (from an Italian crew of architects) flagging community initiatives to address Covid19:
https://www.covidfree-toolkit.org/local-actions/
it has some simple and very practical examples for hand washing (and income generation) and social distancing in several African countries.
Simone


Global Protection Cluster: COVID-19 Protection Risks & Responses Situation Report No.4 as of 29 April 2020

Nils Carstensen
 

Sorry for any cross-mailing but found this useful to share with all.
Greetings
nils

From: GPC <gpc@...>
Sent: Thursday, April 30, 2020 9:49 AM
To: Nils Carstensen <nic@...>
Subject: COVID-19 Protection Risks & Responses Situation Report No.4 as of 29 April 2020
 
COVID-19 Protection Risks & Responses Situation Report No.4 as of 29 April 2020
COVID-19 : A HUMAN RIGHTS CRISIS ?
This Situation Report covers operational updates in countries where the Protection Cluster is active
 
Context update
 

COVID-19 is now reported in 213 countries, areas or territories around the globe (UN OCHA), and the WHO continues to rate the global risk as ‘Very High’. In our areas of operation, we have seen an increase of more than 13,000 cases across the 32 countries. Most operations suspect underreporting due to all, or a combination of, weak reporting systems, deliberate control of figures, lack of testing facilities, as well as testing costs, and growing stigma associated with COVID-19 among some communities.

Across the world the protection space continues to reduce whilst risks are rising. Persons of concern are facing barriers in accessing services, while humanitarian actors encounter obstacles in delivering them. In the past week, a truck bomb in Afrin, Syria, killed up to 60 people.  We also saw the tragic death of a WHO driver caught in cross-fire in Myanmar, along with the death of a front-line health worker in Nigeria, who contracted COVID-19 whilst carrying out humanitarian work.

National Protection Clusters are working to support a safe, dignified and inclusive response to the immediate health needs resulting from the pandemic, whilst also ensuring continuity of vital services for pre-pandemic needs and addressing the related protection and socio-economic consequences that will impact vulnerable populations. The cluster focuses on supporting local and community-based actors where possible.

National Protection Clusters are working to support a safe, dignified and inclusive response to the immediate health needs resulting from the pandemic, whilst also ensuring continuity of vital services for pre-pandemic needs, and addressing the related protection and socio-economic consequences that will impact vulnerable populations. The cluster will focus on supporting local and community-based actors where possible.

In support of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan (GHRP) for COVID-19, The Global Protection Cluster (GPC) is defining a set of minimum packages of support that will be taken by all 32 National Protection Clusters. The GPC has also defined, in support of the Inter Agency Standing Committee (IASC), support activities to be offered to all 66 operations in the GHRP.

Emerging Protection Trends

IN FOCUS: climate change and disasters

Nearly 2,000 disasters triggered 24.9 million new displacements across 140 countries and territories in 2019 (IDMC GRID 2020). This is the highest figure recorded since 2013 and three times the amount of displacements caused by conflict and violence in the past year. The World Food Programme gave a stark warning this week that an additional 130 million people could be pushed into crisis levels of hunger due to because of the socio-economic impact of COVID-19, running alongside 135 million who already facing crisis levels of hunger due to droughts, flooding and violence limiting their access to food.

Climate related disasters are hitting many parts of the world with increasing ferocity. Last year saw two of the biggest cyclones on record, devastate Mozambique just 6 weeks apart. Since the beginning of 2020, parts of the Horn of Africa have seen crops destroyed by millions of locusts, depleting national food reserves. The Sahel is approaching the lean season, where persistent droughts and flooding require families to migrate in search of food – an impossibility in COVID-19 lockdown regulations. Furthermore, many parts of South-East Asia are approaching hurricane season, where their homes are at risk of being ravaged by high winds and flood water.  

The usual response to displacement of potentially thousands of persons affected by droughts or floods is relocating them in temporary shelters, community centres or schools. But this is clearly not an appropriate measure in the COVID-19 pandemic where social distancing and lockdowns are at the forefront of the response. Therefore, it is vital to strengthen community engagement and mechanisms for disseminating information of how communities can safely access assistance, provide early warnings with vital messaging to the affected population will be an essential part of the COVID-19 response in order to get ahead of any of the curve. The GPC will be working to ensure that mechanisms are in place to reach some of the most vulnerable groups and to avoid compounding protection risks.

Conflict and COVID-19: Conflicts continue across the globe, with a spike in armed clashes in March.  Field clusters are reporting that armed groups are taking advantage of COVID-19 and scaling up attacks, forcing people to flee and critically reducing humanitarian access.

  • In Colombia, there have be reports of mass displacements as fighting escalates in the midst of the national measures of compulsory isolation, armed actions have been reported that deepen the pressure of non-state armed actors on communities, generating massive and individual displacement, deepening restrictions on mobility and confinement, forced recruitment, accidents caused by anti-personnel mines, threats to the population and increased risks of GBV for women and children, especially inside homes.
  • Continued attacks on hospital facilities in Libya are hampering the response and people’s ability to access vital health assistance.
  • In South Sudan, there has been an increase on violent local level attacks and increased cattle raiding reported.
  • The Philippines has seen intercommunal fighting since Covid-19 outbreak displace 26,300 individuals (5,300 families) have been newly across Mindanao.
  • An intensification of fighting in Chad has led to displacement of more 25,000, who remain displaced in government declared warzones.

 

GBV: One in three women have been subjected to gender-based violence worldwide. With the threat of COVID-19 and its consequences, including restricted mobility, confinement, reduced community interaction and the closures of services, including support for those at risk or survivors of GBV, there is an increase in the risk of their exposure to GBV.

  • In Haiti, it is reported that GBV violence is particularly high in communities living under the control of gangs in Port au Prince and other big cities in Haiti. Access to these communities is difficult for humanitarian workers. Tensions arising from the Covid-19 epidemic might increase the isolation of victims of GBV in these communities.
  • GBV has been highlighted as a protection risk in Mozambique, particularly around exploitation of women and girls by men in power.
  • The number of reported domestic violence cases has been on the increase in Iraq.
  • There has been a reported increase of femicide across Latin America, where domestic violence shelters have reached capacity or have refused entry to women who cannot provide proof that they have tested negative for COVID-19.
  • Socio-economic downturn heightening risks: Measures to prevent and combat COVID-19 such as restrictions on national and international movements, curfews, limitation of social gatherings inevitably have a strong social and economic impact leaving vulnerable communities at a heightened risk of exploitation, such as trafficking, child-labour and early marriage.

    Freedom of movement: Forced return and movement of people is reported in several operations while at the same time, limitations on or discriminatory freedom of movement remain a major concern for people living in internal displacement camps and sites.

  • In Colombia, the order of the national government limits the mobility of the population in the territories, but also of the protection actors. Non-state armed actors have used this argument to consolidate control over territories which could include restrictions on access to food, medicines, control over the entry and exit of members of specific communities.
  • In Syria, there are 6.1 million displaced people that often live in over-crowded conditions, in close proximity to others, with inadequate access to water and sanitation services, where social distancing is impossible and conditions are ripe for transmission of disease. Currently, around 297,455 IDPs and other communities live in fourteen camps and five informal settlements within Syria.

 

Discrimination and stigma: Limited and discriminatory access to services, including health, is reported across several operations, as well as stigmatization of people and communities accused of carrying the virus. Psychological distress, arbitrary and/or limited access to protection services and/or humanitarian assistance are other trends.

  • In Central America, many of the quarantine centres where returnees are being held are completely out of access for humanitarians and it is unclear on the of protection and humanitarian standards that are being followed.
  • In Haiti, following the recent attempts of lynching, stigmatization of Covid-19 patients is raising in the country to the point that there are presumptions of contaminated patients who can afford consulting a doctor but are not willing to be tested.
  • In Burundi Increased stigmatization and incidents of abuse have been observed against foreigners due to fear that they might be carrying Covid-19.
  • In Cameroon, persons with specific needs are at greater risk as they might face double exclusion from the society, limited access to information and special services, separated from their caregivers in case of infection.

 

Increased evictions: There has also been an increase in evictions or threats of evictions reported in some countries, due to limited financial means to pay rent and the economic needs of landlords. Female single parents reported challenges as they can no longer be assisted by their relatives.

  • In Colombia: Even after the signing of the peace agreement, in the midst of the COVID-19 emergency, communities continue to be affected by the lack of security of tenure.
  • In Iraq evictions remain one of the key protection concerns for communities.
  • In Somalia, forced evictions represent a constant threat for vulnerable communities in the country including displaced populations living in collective settlements and other urban poor in densely populated areas. In the context of a COVID-19 outbreak, continued evictions could leave thousands of households to the street, without basic requirements for survival exposing already vulnerable populations to greater security and health risks as well as aggravating already-fragile conditions for internally displaced people.

 

Children at risk: COVID-19 can quickly change the living environment of children. Measures such as the closure of schools, restrictions on population movements and social gatherings, disrupt the rhythms and social support for children and can put them at risk. The risks of family separations can increase (sick parents, quarantine, or displacement), as well as the risks of death of sick parents, even stigmatization and exploitation of children who survive them. Negative coping mechanisms such as early marriage, trafficking and child labour are also a risk when families face socioeconomic hardship.

  • Families returning to their areas of origin in Burundi are reporting family separation when put into quarantine, heightening risks for children
  • Family reunification has been temporarily suspended in Lake Chad Basin where a high number of unaccompanied and separated minors are.

Abuse of power: Due to the COVID-19 crisis, individual and community protection capacities may be disrupted. There have been outcries of police brutality measures used to enforce lock down.

  • In Burundi, it is reported that authorities are arresting or taking out debts on those who cannot pay quarantine.
  • In Guatemala, when the measures to contain the spread of COVID-19 were announced, the Ministry of Labor has received over 1,500 complaints of labor abuses and over 770 complaints of violations of labor rights, including, simulation of vacation with pay, for layoffs, for work at home without pay or without overtime pay and those for suspension of work without pay.
  • In Honduras, there are reports of groups going door to door to extort people for money, along with aid being distributed in line with political affiliation.
  • In Colombia non-State armed actors have deepened social control and pressure on the communities. The effects are the worsening of human rights violations and the invisibility of risk situations due to the difficulties of risk monitoring processes for both institutions and humanitarian actors.

Older people and persons with disability: The pandemic has been most devastating for the lives, health and well-being of older persons, people with underlying medical conditions, and those with lower socio-economic status – a category that tracks closely with minority status in most countries. The situation of persons with disabilities, especially those with underlying health conditions or in institutions, is particularly grave and it may be harder for persons with disabilities to take prudent steps to protect themselves.

IN FOCUS: MYANMAR

Despite the call for a global ceasefire, conflict in Myanmar continues, and dozens of civilians have been killed as fighting between the Myanmar military and the armed groups have escalated in recent weeks. Tragically on 20th April, a marked UN-vehicle, carrying surveillance supplies for COVID-19 response, was caught in cross-fire, killing the driver. The UN released its condemnation here.

 Political and inter-communal conflict have been the cause of regular displacements in Myanmar. Several armed groups in Kachin, Shan and Chin states are still in active conflict with the Myanmar military. Rakhine state was the scene of mass displacement in 2012 and more recently in 2016 and 2017 when 800,000 members of the Rohingya ethnic group sought refuge in neighbouring Bangladesh. Monsoon rains also trigger new displacements every year (IDMC GRID 2020).

 In Rakhine State where there are currently 130,000 IDPs living in camps, their access to health services was extremely limited pre-COVID outbreak. Living in enclosed camps in Sittwe, the displaced population are extremely vulnerable if there should there be an outbreak, with poor sanitation conditions and limited access to services. The Myanmar Government has recently started the process of releasing prisoners from over-crowded prison sites in the country and returning many to Sittwe. The Protection Cluster is working with state authorities and health actors to ensure protection measures are put in place for returnees if being placed in quarantine. The will also be advocating to ensure clear information is available to IDPs in Sittwe where there has been an increase in number of calls to the protection hotline in past weeks.

Operational Challenges and Support
 

The overall operational context is challenging. Restrictions on movements and access to communities is very limited causing the temporary suspension of many operations. Protection actors are adapting their delivery modalities to remote delivery, online or through community-based organizations and community leaders. Field Clusters are now revising plans to align country plans with the Global Humanitarian Response Plan.

Operational coordination at sub national level is most affected due to communications difficulties and administrative barriers to movements. Confinement is also taking its toll on humanitarian and protection staff, and in several operations foreign aid workers are perceived as virus transmitters.

Several countries have established COVID-19 task forces, groups or committees for the coordination of the response to the emergency, in support of Government-led responses or plans. In most cases these are represented by UN Agencies and INGOs, but often not by clusters / sectors.

 

In parallel, HCTs and inter-cluster or inter-sector coordination groups have been working on humanitarian preparedness and response planning. Most operations have completed or are working to complete specific COVID-19 multi-sectoral plans, as annex or addendum to 2020 HRPs. These plans are focusing on identifying original HRP interventions that are deemed priority or in need of expansion to respond to COVID-19 impacts (but still largely underfunded), as well as new interventions and financial requirements identified.

Key Highlights from the response:
  • New and adapted online protection training for community mobilisers and partners has happened across many responses including Afghanistan, Colombia, Iraq, Somalia and Yemen
  • Protection considerations for interventions in quarantine facilities were rolled out in several operations including Palestine, South Sudan, Syria, and Yemen
  • Remote systems for case management of GBV is being explored in Colombia and Lake Chad Basin
  • Rumour tracking is underway in places like South Sudan to ensure an understanding on how the virus is being understood within communities to ultimately help the response and tackle misinformation that could put communities at harm
GPC Operational Footprint

Based on consultations with the National Protection Clusters, the GPC has synthesized ongoing and planned activities into a minimum package of support. This package ensures that activity. This “Operational Footprint” on COVID-19

  • Identifies a minimum package of critical activities to be implemented feasibly in all protection cluster operations.
  •  Aims to increase predictability and clarity for key stakeholders on what can be expected from NPCs/FPCs.
  • Intends to foster sharing learning and best practices across operations.
  • Provides a framework of key protection actions for the country chapters of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan (GHRP), the revisions of country Humanitarian Response Plans and of National Peace and Development Plans

 

The operational footprint focuses on 5 key protection deliverables:
Effective and safe, dignified and inclusive: guidance and advocacy including on quarantine centre and shielding measures, trainings and operational support
Protection monitoring and protection analysis: harmonized protection needs assessments and monitoring, regular situation reports, monthly protection briefs and analysis
Protection advocacy: advocacy messages and campaigns
Protection awareness raising activities and campaigns: rights awareness and information dissemination, culturally adapted and through appropriate channels
Protection service delivery: alternative modalities for case management, adapted referral pathways, community-driven protection, Individual Protection Assistance (IPA), including cash for protection, MHP
Humanitarian Response Plans and COVID-19 Plans

Over the last week field operations have completed finalizing country chapters as part of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan for COVID19.

The overall protection cluster requirements are split in to two: 256M USD additional money required to addressing COVID-19. These 256M USD are in addition to 2BN USD appealed for under the Global Humanitarian Overview and the country Humanitarian Response Plans.

 

The proportion of protection asks from the total HRPs and COVID-19 plans vary between different operations. The variations are explained by the difference in protection risks and needs, contexts, operational capacity, feasibility and overall conditions put in place by the humanitarian leadership. We have also noted that the representation of response programmes dedicated to protection challenges that do not have a designated Areas of Responsibility leads varies from country to country including for addressing psychosocial support and trafficking in human persons as well as working with persons with disability, older people and youth. With your support we will be striving towards better harmonisation in the upcoming opportunities: updates of the GHRPs, Revision on the HRP 2020 and development of the HRP 2021.

For more information or queries, please contact the GPC COVID/19 lead, Deputy Global Coordinator, Sofia Khetib-Grundy khetibgr@....

The Global Protection Cluster is a network of NGOs, international organizations and UN agencies, engaged in protection work in humanitarian crises including armed conflict, climate change related and natural disaster. The GPC ensures well-coordinated, effective and principled protection preparedness and responses, and that protection is at the core of all humanitarian action and recognized as essential in any nexus with development and peace. The GPC unites members, partners and communities working on the full gamut of protection activities, including in four specialized Areas of Responsibility: Child Protection, Gender-Based Violence (GBV), Housing, Land and Property and Mine Action. The GPC contributes to and benefits from the broader IASC system.
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Community responses and migrant workers from Myanmar

nils carstensen
 

Hi all,
Below two links to the “Frontier Myanmar” shared by good collegues on this group. Both illustrate the particular challenges for Myanmar migrant workers - and the important role of community volunteers and self-help abroad and in the communities they return to.



Greetings
nils

nils carstensen
Local to Global Protection
E-mail: nic@...





Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

ahmedjamal sourani
 

Thank you much Alex and ALL !
Ahmed


From: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> on behalf of Alex Carle <alex@...>
Sent: Sunday, April 26, 2020 2:35 PM
To: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...>
Subject: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…
 

Sorry to fill your inboxes but this is also interesting and some may want to use the free service.

Alex

 

 

From: Alex Carle
Sent: 26 April 2020 14:32
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: RE: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Dear all

Have people seen this report about how CSOs have been affected by COVID?

Alex

 

+44 (0)7725205493                                                              Conference calls: Whereby.com/ourloop

Alex@...                                                                 Skype: talktoalexx     

@AlexCarleNZ                                                                     @Our_Loop_io

LinkedIn:                                                                               www.OurLoop.io

 

 

 

From: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> On Behalf Of Nils Carstensen via dgroups.io
Sent: 25 April 2020 10:13
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

... and just following on from the above - a Kenyan decical researchers’ perspective on the importance of engaging and working at the community level:

Africa's Covid-19 research must be tailored to its realities – by its own scientists

 

nils carstensen

senior humanitarian advisor

Local2Global & DanChurchAid

Mb (roaming) +45 29700641

 

 

 


Fra: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> på vegne af Justin Corbett <localrealities@...>
Sendt: Friday, April 24, 2020 11:53:20 PM
Til: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...>
Emne: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Many thanks Nils.

 

Just to add to the food for thought, this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ does  a very good job at laying out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries.

And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection (so worth staying through the slower beginning to get there). Worth sharing I think.

 

all best

justin

 

On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 at 00:08, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance KenyaLima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team

 

 

nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Alex Carle
 

Sorry to fill your inboxes but this is also interesting and some may want to use the free service.

Alex

 

 

From: Alex Carle
Sent: 26 April 2020 14:32
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: RE: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Dear all

Have people seen this report about how CSOs have been affected by COVID?

Alex

 

+44 (0)7725205493                                                              Conference calls: Whereby.com/ourloop

Alex@...                                                                 Skype: talktoalexx     

@AlexCarleNZ                                                                     @Our_Loop_io

LinkedIn:                                                                               www.OurLoop.io

 

 

 

From: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> On Behalf Of Nils Carstensen via dgroups.io
Sent: 25 April 2020 10:13
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

... and just following on from the above - a Kenyan decical researchers’ perspective on the importance of engaging and working at the community level:

Africa's Covid-19 research must be tailored to its realities – by its own scientists

 

nils carstensen

senior humanitarian advisor

Local2Global & DanChurchAid

Mb (roaming) +45 29700641

 

 

 


Fra: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> på vegne af Justin Corbett <localrealities@...>
Sendt: Friday, April 24, 2020 11:53:20 PM
Til: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...>
Emne: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Many thanks Nils.

 

Just to add to the food for thought, this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ does  a very good job at laying out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries.

And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection (so worth staying through the slower beginning to get there). Worth sharing I think.

 

all best

justin

 

On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 at 00:08, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance KenyaLima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team

 

 

nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Alex Carle
 

Dear all

Have people seen this report about how CSOs have been affected by COVID?

Alex

 

+44 (0)7725205493                                                              Conference calls: Whereby.com/ourloop

Alex@...                                                                 Skype: talktoalexx     

@AlexCarleNZ                                                                     @Our_Loop_io

LinkedIn:                                                                               www.OurLoop.io

 

 

 

From: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> On Behalf Of Nils Carstensen via dgroups.io
Sent: 25 April 2020 10:13
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

... and just following on from the above - a Kenyan decical researchers’ perspective on the importance of engaging and working at the community level:

Africa's Covid-19 research must be tailored to its realities – by its own scientists

 

nils carstensen

senior humanitarian advisor

Local2Global & DanChurchAid

Mb (roaming) +45 29700641

 

 

 


Fra: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> på vegne af Justin Corbett <localrealities@...>
Sendt: Friday, April 24, 2020 11:53:20 PM
Til: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...>
Emne: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Many thanks Nils.

 

Just to add to the food for thought, this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ does  a very good job at laying out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries.

And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection (so worth staying through the slower beginning to get there). Worth sharing I think.

 

all best

justin

 

On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 at 00:08, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance KenyaLima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team

 

 

nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Nils Carstensen
 

... and just following on from the above - a Kenyan decical researchers’ perspective on the importance of engaging and working at the community level:
Africa's Covid-19 research must be tailored to its realities – by its own scientists
https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/apr/25/africas-covid-19-research-must-be-tailored-to-its-realities-by-its-own-scientists?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

nils carstensen
senior humanitarian advisor
Local2Global & DanChurchAid
nic@...
Mb (roaming) +45 29700641

www.local2global.info

www.danchurchaid.org


Fra: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...> på vegne af Justin Corbett <localrealities@...>
Sendt: Friday, April 24, 2020 11:53:20 PM
Til: community-crisis-response@... <community-crisis-response@...>
Emne: Re: [community-crisis-response] Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…
 
Many thanks Nils.

Just to add to the food for thought, this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ does  a very good job at laying out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries.
And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection (so worth staying through the slower beginning to get there). Worth sharing I think.

all best
justin

On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 at 00:08, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance Kenya, Lima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team



nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Re: Covid-19 and community action - a challenge and some tough questions to us all.

Ashley South <lerdoh3@...>
 

Many thanks Nils. Looks very good, and reads well.

All the best, Ashley

 

 

From: Nils Carstensen <nic@...>
Sent: 24 April 2020 19:09
To: community-crisis-response@...
Subject: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance KenyaLima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team

 

 

nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Re: Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Justin Corbett
 

Many thanks Nils.

Just to add to the food for thought, this short film picturinghealth.org/covid-on-the-breadline/ does  a very good job at laying out the reasons why lock-downs in some countries may not be the best solution. In addition to the economic and civic space issues, it highlights the impact of reduced attention to all the existing public health crises that so many are facing in so many countries.
And, using a good appreciative inquiry approach , it also offers some nice examples of how communities are coming up with their own ideas of how to protect most vulnerable from infection (so worth staying through the slower beginning to get there). Worth sharing I think.

all best
justin

On Sat, 25 Apr 2020 at 00:08, Nils Carstensen <nic@...> wrote:

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance Kenya, Lima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team



nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection


Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

Nils Carstensen
 

Covid-19 and community action – a challenge and some tough questions to us all…

 

As the Covid-19 crisis spreads, examples of autonomous community action continuous to surface – but equally do reports of how individuals and communities are struggling to survive and protect themselves during the double or triple whammy of a) the Covid crisis itself, 2) the economic crisis riding on its tail – and 3) a crisis of abuse of power by some authorities under the pretext of Covid-19.

 

Inspired by ongoing exchanges and conversations about the examples of community and citizen-led crisis responses to Covid-19, L2GP is launching a “light” action research into such responses. The research focus on answering questions like: How do individuals and families, self-help and community groups respond to the threats and challenges directly or indirectly posed by the coronavirus? What can be learned from different responses/adaptations?

If you (or colleagues you know) is interested to contribute to this research, please contact nils at nic@.... And – importantly – please keep feeding example and good practice into this e-mail list and we’ll pick it up from here, while you same time make it available to a growing number of colleagues around the world.

 

Community and citizen action

From Zimbabwe a colleague reports how, “because of water shortages/water crisis in communities across Harare’s high-density suburbs fetch water from communal boreholes, and unprotected wells. In that instance some community volunteers man boreholes to raise awareness.” The Thai Inquirer reports how indigenous self-help groups find creative ways of supporting each other’s livelihoods in the absence of support from the state – among other through some rather creative fish-for-rise swaps between farming and fishing communities. Media reports from poor areas of Rio de Janeiro(Brasil) and Bogota (Colombia) illustrate how initial voluntary sharing of food and general helpfulness among families and neighbors is eroding as prolonged lock downs and related loss of income is exhausting everybody’s resources – and with that also the ability to help one another. As desperation grows, so does social and political unrest including violence and the occasional looting of shops as for instance reported in some urban areas in for instance Kenya, Lima and South Africa.

 

At the same time, the UN and others are warning that the Covid-19 crisis is likely to contribute significantly to widespread food shortages and hunger, a worsening of known diseases and health crisis (malaria, TB, HIV, measles etc.), growing domestic and gender-based violence - as well as massively deepening poverty for millions of people in a large number of countries. Many of these knock-on effects are associated with the economic effects of the various social distancing and lock down measures now in place across much of the globe in a response to Covid-19. Additionally, even if hardly surprising, the Carnegie Foundation and Index on Censorship between them paint a concerning picture of how governments are hampering, restricting or simply shutting up civil society activists and media professionals under the pretext of the Covid Crisis.

 

In short: Balancing measures to slow down the spread of Covid-19 with allowing citizens to keep up livelihoods, feeding their families or meeting other crucial medical needs (malaria, TB, HIV, diabetes etc.) and keeping checks and balances on the authorities may be working out to some extent in many well-off societies. But it is becoming increasingly evident, that this is not working out for millions of people across many parts the world with less developed social services, health care and economic compensation programs. Covid-19 is likely to be with us for months if not years to come – yet the strategies chosen so far seems unsustainable in multitude of countries and contexts - even in the short term.

 

A question and a challenge to you - and us

Politicians, military and economic power holders along with health authorities and to a lesser extent civil society leader are making tough decisions on how to strike the above balance in countries across the world every single day right now.

 

But what are your thoughts on this? What are your experience, based on interactions with fellow citizens and communities, with ways to balance the need to protect yourself, your family and your community from Covid-19 - while having to meet the need to earn and income and secure the next meal… and the one after that?

 

There are no easy answers here, but we believe that bringing forward the voices of those rarely heard is as crucial right now as it has ever been. Please keep sharing your thoughts and examples – either by simply answering into this e-mail thread or sending it directly to nic@...

 

All the best

nils for the L2GP team



nils carstensen
senior advisor, Local2GlobalProtection
www.local2global.info


Resource on COVID-19 Do No Harm AVAILABLE NOW

Nils Carstensen
 

Hi all,
Sunra (at DCA) has just shared this guidance on Covid-19 conflict sensitive considerations. Feel free to contact Sunra directly if you need further information.
nils

The current COVID-19 global crisis is immense in scale, and the full implications of its impact are yet to be understood. A new ACT Alliance resource on COVID-19 Conflict Sensitive Considerations  is now available (with links to the DCA Programme Guide on Coronavirus). The ACT site is a freely accessible resource for all organisations (both local and global) that seek to explore how COVID-19 may affect the way we work, so that we can Do No Harm, Do Some Good, and if possible contribute to sustainable Peace.

Sunra Lambert-Baj 

Community Safety Advisor 

DanChurchAid 

Email: sulb@...

Mobile 1: +45 50 60 40 50 / Mobile 2: +45 50 22 09 41

Whatsapp: +44 7956 594 117

Skype: sunra.lambertbaj




Resilience in Times of Crisis | New Video: Rawa Through The Voices of Its Community

ahmedjamal sourani
 

Dear Community Crisis Response DG,

As a member of the Advisory Board of RAWA Fund, I am pleased to share with you below 'stories of community resilience' for your kind information. Two of Christian Aid partners in Gaza (CFTA & PARC) are facilitating RAWA's relevant community-led initiatives (as a fiscal umbrella). For more information please visit below links.

In peace & safety!

Ahmed Sourani

Christian Aid Consultant-Gaza

From: Rawa Fund <info@...>
Sent: Wednesday, April 15, 2020 4:19 PM
To: Ahmed <Haninahmed@...>
Subject: Resilience in Times of Crisis | New Video: Rawa Through The Voices of Its Community
 

Stories of Community Resilience from Initiatives Supported by Rawa 

In the midst of the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic, what we are seeing in Palestine is something Rawa was founded on: the power of community. 

In Gaza, where Israeli blockade and decades of systematic de-development heighten fears of the spread of the virus, the initiative Strengthening the Role of Marginalized Communities re-allocated its remaining Rawa grant funds to respond to the public health crisis. Their network of local committees is mobilizing to provide access to health information, emergency medical equipment, and medical responses to marginalized groups.
Dana making art at home and sharing it with Art to Heart.
“This imposed new reality is already confusing and stressful to parents and children, let alone children with special needs,” said Suha Khaffash from Nablus based initiative Art to Heart, an initiative that is guided by the belief that art can transform lives and drive social change. When they had to shut their doors due to lockdown orders, Art to Heart’s community of artists, volunteers, and children (mostly with disabilities and special needs) worked together to continue their mission virtually. Using art to cope with the crisis, they’ve sent art supplies to the children, posted how-to and storytelling videos, and the children have been sharing back the art they’ve been creating.
  Yara Dowani working at Om Sleiman farm.
With the West Bank under quarantine orders, Palestinian environmentalists are noting some of the positive effects of human lockdown for wildlife and in reducing pollution. Yet, the threats to Palestinian land and property from Israeli occupation remain. Yara Dowani from Om Sleiman farm highlights the long-term benefits of Palestinian efforts to maintain nurturing and beneficial relationships with the environment: “During these uncertain times we believe that, now more than ever, small farms like Om Sleiman should shine as a sustainable economic model that doesn’t get affected by the capitalist and consumerist system,” Dowani said.
Haifa Youth Movement's “Corona Memoir: Stories from Quarantine.”
To get through this crisis, but also ensure we collectively remember its lessons, Haifa Youth Movement launched a multi-media community memoir project. Over the coming month, they will gather personal stories (literature, analysis, poetry, drawings, photographs, and more) of life under quarantine for Palestinians in different areas and how we envision the future impacts. If you’d like to share your story, you can do so through this form. We’ll be following Haifa Youth Movement online to see the stories as they begin sharing them.
Our prisoners and the Corona: "A Quarantine Inside a Quarantine."
Meanwhile, Metras.co, an independent media platform, has been publishing articles with analysis and information about the outbreak and its impacts. This is especially important because while there has been strong analysis from some corners of the international media about the developing situation in Palestine (we are collecting many of these resources on our website), when the crisis hit there was a stark lack of accurate public information in Arabic.

In the small village of Hizma, near Jerusalem, the Hizma Education initiative took part in an inspiring collaboration between civil society and the government, joining a coalition of community groups that, together with the municipality, pooled resources to create an alternative network of support for Coronavirus response.
These examples of creativity and resilience give us hope, but we know the work ahead is great and the challenges are many
We have yet to know the full effects of the pandemic on communities living in an already quarantined, overpopulated, and incarcerated Palestine. Whether in besieged Gaza, the military occupied West Bank, the overpopulated city of Nazareth, or confined in a refugee camp, some still lack access to adequate health services and the ability to practice distancing or follow basic medical advice. Meanwhile, Israeli human rights violations continue, including attacks and raids on people under shelter-at-home orders, and attempts to prevent Palestinian efforts to overcome the pandemic. 
 
In this dire context, it is no surprise to Rawa that grassroots communities are already demonstrating creativity and resilience, revitalizing a sense of solidarity and collectivity, and drawing more attention to the importance of civic engagement, volunteerism, local giving and mutual aid, and community access to power and resources.
New Video: Rawa Through the Voices of Its Community
When it all seems overwhelming, we turn to each other, having known since Rawa’s beginning that strength (especially during a crisis) comes from communities and from ensuring people’s voices are heard and that power is in their hands. Our new video featuring voices from the initiatives supported in our 2019 grant cycle tells it best. 
Strengthening Community Resilience in the Coming Months

We want to support the crucial efforts of people who have been volunteering their time and working above and beyond their usual roles to make up for the gaps in healthcare and medical supplies, to set up community-based food and service deliveries to care for their neighbors and elders, and much more. 

That’s why we are doing what we can to support short and long-term mutual aid efforts and creative approaches to resilience. 

1- We’ve eased grant requirements so existing grantees can reallocate funds to respond to the crisis, delayed reporting requirements, and taken other measures to be as flexible and responsive as we can be. Since equitable, flexible, responsive philanthropy that shifts powers to communities is something we already advocate for locally and globally, we’ve been encouraged and inspired by the actions of our own funding partners as well many other funders and grantmakers around the world who took quick action to shift their practices and provide urgent support to frontline communities. We joined many of them by co-signing this COVID-19 philanthropy pledge.

2- We are working closely with our partners and donors to provide direct funding to grassroots groups as early as the summer to address urgent and emergent needs, and will follow up to support mid- and longer-term responses in the fall with our annual grants cycle. 

You can support these efforts by contributing to our Community Resilience Fund, which will aid our efforts to map and understand the community responses and needs in different areas across Palestine, provide direct funding to grassroots groups to amplify their efforts, and create virtual spaces for togetherness, learning, and organizing. 

Thank you for all you’ve been doing to get us all through this together, and for keeping up hope.

With gratitude,
The Rawa Family 

To read more examples of Palestinian community resilience during the Coronavirus pandemic, as well as analysis and information of the challenges and context, including some of the global response, we invite you to access this list, and share any additions at info@....
 
.Click here to read our previous newsletter 
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كيف تكيفت بعض المبادرات المدعومة من صندوق روى ؟

في خضم جائحة فيروس كورونا، ما نراه في فلسطين يعكس الدعائم التي قام عليها صندوق روى: "القوة الكامنة في المجتمع".

 في غزة، حيث الحصار الإسرائيلي المقترن مع عقود من التخريب المنهجي المنظم ومع ازدياد المخاوف من انتشار الفيروس في القطاع، أعادت مبادرة "تعزيز دور المجتمعات المهمشة" تخصيص الميزانية المتبقية من منحة صندوق روى للاستجابة لأزمة الصحة العامة. قامت كذلك شبكة اللجان المحلية بحشد الموارد لتوفير الوصول إلى المعلومات الصحية والمعدات الطبية الطارئة والاستجابات الطبية للفئات المحرومة.
دانا تبدع في البيت وتشارك فنها مع مبادرة فن من القلب.

قالت سهى خفش من مبادرة "فن من القلب" في نابلس، وهي مبادرة تثق بقدرة الفن على تغيير حياة الناس والدفع نحو التغيير الاجتماعي: "إن الواقع الجديد المفروض مربك ومجهد للأهل والأطفال، ناهيك عن الأطفال ذوي الاحتياجات الخاصة. عندما اضطررنا لإغلاق أبوابنا بسبب الوضع، سعى مجتمع "فن من القلب" والذي يضم الفنانين والمتطوعين والأطفال (ومعظمهم من ذوي الإعاقات والاحتياجات الخاصة) لمواصلة عمله رقميا،  باستخدام الفن للتعامل مع تأثيرات الأزمة. فقمنا بتوزيع مستلزمات فنية إلى الأطفال، ونشرنا مقاطع فيديو إرشادية ومقاطع رواية القصص لهم . كانت النتيجة أن شاركنا الأطفال فنونهم من داخل الحجر وفي البيوت." 

يارا دواني تعمل في مزرعة أم سليمان.
مع خضوع الضفة الغربية لأوامر الحجر الصحي، لاحظ علماء البيئة الفلسطينيون بعض الآثار الإيجابية للحظر البشري على الحياة البرية وفي الحد من التلوث. ومع ذلك، لا تزال التهديدات التي تتعرض لها الأراضي والممتلكات الفلسطينية من الاحتلال الإسرائيلي مستمرة بدون توقف. يارا دواني صاحبة مزرعة أم سليمان تسلط الضوء على الفوائد طويلة الأمد للجهود الفلسطينية للحفاظ على العلاقات الغنية والمفيدة مع البيئة وتقول: "في هذه الأوقات المضطربة نعتقد أنه الآن أكثر من أي وقت مضى ، يجب أن تبرز المزارع الصغيرة مثل مزرعة أم سليمان لتشكل نموذجا لاقتصاد مستدام لا يتأثر بالنظام الرأسمالي والاستهلاكي."
ومن ضمن مبادرات التغلب على هذه الأزمة، و للتأكد من أننا نتذكر بشكل جماعي دروسها، قررت "حركة شباب حيفا" إطلاق مذكّرات تضم مجموعة أعمال، من نصوص أدبيّة، تحليليّة، شعريّة، رسومات، كاريكاتورية، تصوير فوتوغرافي وغيرها خلال الشهر المقبل. عبرها، سيشاركوا ‏قصص شخصيّة من داخل الحجر الصحي تصور أثر هذه الأزمة المستقبلي على حياتنا. ‏إذا كنت ترغب في مشاركة قصتك، يمكنك القيام بذلك من خلال تعبئة هذا النموذج. سنتابع حركة شباب حيفا لرؤية القصص التي سيقوموا بمشاركتها قريبا على موقعهم.  
سلسلة متراس حول الكورونا في فلسطين
"متراس" - منصة الإعلام المستقلة,  تنشر مقالات تحتوي على تحليلات ومعلومات حول تفشي الفيروس وتأثيراته. اهمية ذلك تنبع بسبب النقص الحاد في المعلومات العامة الدقيقة بالعربية في الوقت الذي تقوم به بعض أركان وسائل الإعلام الدولية بنشر وتعميم وتحليل  حول الوضع المتطور في فلسطين (نحن نجمع العديد من هذه الموارد على موقعنا).

في قرية حزما الصغيرة، بالقرب من القدس، شاركت مبادرة "التعليم في حزما" بتعاون ملهم ما بين المجتمع المدني والحكومة، وانضمت إلى تحالف من المجموعات القاعدية التي قامت بدورها بالتعاون مع البلدية  لتجميع الموارد لإنشاء شبكة بديلة لدعم جهود الاستجابة لفيروس كورونا.
هذه الأمثلة على الإبداع والتكيف تعطينا الأمل، مدركين أن العمل الدؤوب والتحديات أمامنا كبيرة.
لا يزال يتعين علينا معرفة الآثار الكاملة للوباء على المجتمعات التي تعيش في فلسطين المحجورة بالفعل و المكتظة بالسكان والسجناء. سواء كنت في غزة المحاصرة، أو الضفة الغربية القابعة تحت الاحتلال العسكري، أو مدينة الناصرة المكتظة بالسكان، أو محاصرًا في مخيم اللاجئين، لا يزال غالبيتنا يفتقر إلى الخدمات الصحية الضرورية والقدرة على ممارسة الإبتعاد الجسدي أو اتباع النصائح الطبية الأساسية. في غضون ذلك ، تستمر الانتهاكات الإسرائيلية لحقوق الإنسان، بما في ذلك الهجوم والاعتقالات على الأشخاص الخاضعين لأوامر الالتزام في البيت، مترافقا مع محاولات منع الجهود الفلسطينية للتغلب على الوباء.

في هذا السياق المخيف، ليس من المفاجئ لروى أن تظهر المجتمعات القاعدية اشكال وانواع  من الإبداع والمرونة في أوجه نشاطها، وتحفز الشعور بالتضامن والعمل الجماعي، وتلفت المزيد من الانتباه إلى أهمية المشاركة المجتمعية والتطوع والعطاء والمساعدة المتبادلة ومدى امتلاك المجتمع للقوة والموارد.
أصوات من شبكة روى: فيديو جديد
عندما تغمرنا ظروف كهذه ، نتوجه بالضرورة إلى بعضنا البعض، لأننا وثقنا منذ بداية رحلة صندوق روى أن القوة (خاصة أثناء الأزمات) تأتي من رحم المجتمعات ومن الاستماع لأصوات الناس ومن امتلاكهم مصدر القوة. الفيديو الجديد الذي يضم أصوات المبادرات المدعومة في دورة المنح لعام 2019 يخبركم/ن بشكل أفضل.
تعزيز صمود المجتمع في الأشهر القادمة
نسعى إلى دعم الجهود الحيوية/المفصلية لاولئك الذين يتطوعون بوقتهم ويعملون بما يتجاوز أدوارهم المعتادة لتعويض الثغرات في الرعاية الصحية والإمدادات الطبية، سواء للقيام بتوصيل الطعام وتقديم الخدمات المجتمعية لرعاية جيرانهم وكبار السن، أو أكثر من ذلك بكثير.

لهذا السبب، نبذل ما في وسعنا لدعم جهود المساعدة المتبادلة القصيرة وطويلة الأجل وكل الأساليب الإبداعية في الصمود والتكيف المقاوم.

1- قمنا بتسهيل متطلبات المنحة حتى يتمكن المستفيدون الحاليون من إعادة تخصيص الميزانية للاستجابة للأزمة، وتأخير موعد تقديم التقارير، واتخذنا إجراءات أخرى مرنة ومستجيبة قدر الإمكان. فكون العمل الاجتماعي العادل والمرن وسريع الاستجابة الذي يعيد القوة إلى المجتمعات أمر ندافع عنه بالفعل محليًا وعالميًا، فقد تم تشجيعنا وإلهامنا من خلال إجراءات قام بها شركائنا وكذلك العديد من الممولين والمانحين الآخرين حول العالم الذين أخذوا بسرعة العمل على تغيير ممارساتهم وتقديم الدعم العاجل للمجتمعات في خط المواجهة. لقد انضممنا إلى العديد منهم من خلال التوقيع المشترك على تعهد COVID-19 للعطاء المجتمعي.

2- نحن نعمل بشكل وثيق مع شركائنا والمانحين لتوفير الدعم المباشر، في بداية الصيف، للمجموعات القاعدية لتلبية الاحتياجات العاجلة والطارئة، وسوف نتابع العمل لدعم الاستجابات المتوسطة والطويلة الأمد في الخريف تزامنا مع دورة المنح السنوية.

يمكنك دعم هذه الجهود من خلال المساهمة  لصندوق صمود المجتمع الخاص بنا، والذي سيساعدنا على معاينة وفهم استجابات المجتمع واحتياجاته في مناطق مختلفة عبر فلسطين، وتوفير دعم مباشر المجموعات القاعدية لتعميق جهودها ، وخلق مساحات افتراضية للعمل الجماعي والتعلم والتنظيم.

نشكرك على كل ما كنت تقوم به لنجتاز هذه المرحلة سوية، و لإبقاء الأمل أمام أعيننا.

مع الشكر والامتنان،
`عائلة روى
للاطلاع والاستفادة هناك المزيد من الأمثلة على قدرة المجتمع الفلسطيني على الصمود خلال جائحة فيروس كورونا، بالإضافة إلى التحليل والمعلومات حول التحديات والسياق الخاص بنا، بما في ذلك بعض الاستجابة العالمية، ندعوك للدخول إلى هذه القائمة واضافة المزيد info@... .

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Inspiration from Palestine, South Africa and Nigeria

nils carstensen
 

Hi all,
Below just a few updates and links with inspirations shared with colleagues over the last days. Please do keep your updates coming - and preferably share them directly via this e-mail group!

By the way: Some e-mail programs/apps tend to dump e-mails from d-groups into your spam mail - even after you told the prgram it’s not spam. So please check once in a while - and keep tellingl the program/app to stop misbehaving. And yes - you guessed it - this sure does include my own outlook/microsoft accounts…


From Gaza and Palestine, our colleague Ahmed Sourani shared yesterday an update from RAWA (Creative Palestinian Communities Fund). Shortly Ahmed will share the full update via this e-mail list - but till then for instance this initiative to gather personal stories on life under quarantine struck me as a good inspiration to think beyond material needs and challenges:
"To get through this crisis, but also ensure we collectively remember its lessons, Haifa Youth Movement launched a multi-media community memoir project. Over the coming month, they will gather personal stories (literature, analysis, poetry, drawings, photographs, and more) of life under quarantine for Palestinians in different areas and how we envision the future impacts. If you’d like to share your story, you can do so through this form. We’ll be following Haifa Youth Movement online to see the stories as they begin sharing them."
e77f4498-e6c3-4e8c-ae72-780dd0f39a70.jpg
Our prisoners and the Corona: "A Quarantine Inside a Quarantine."



Oxfam has initiated a great blog focused on Covid in different parts of Africa. It’s many links and contributions are relevant way beyond the African continent - look it up here:

From this blog, just two examples below I would highlight:

From South Africa this contribution really struck me as useful and illustrative of how advocacy can be applied in the context of a corona response: “Covid Advocacy in South Africa’s Shanty Towns – What Works?”. Here Albert van Zyl of IBP writes:
“…...The next few days were a blur, but while working on the pamphlet, IBP South Africa and its partners—SASDI Alliance, Planact and Afesis-corplan—began working on an initiative called Asivikelane, “Let us protect each other” in Zulu. Its goal: to mobilize settlement residents to monitor failures in delivery of critical hygiene services and report the problems.
To date, partner organizations have enlisted the help of 253 residents from 100 informal settlements in the six largest cities. If the internet and cellphone networks hold up (this is all done remotely), we estimate that in the weeks to come we will be able to ramp up the initiative to include many more settlements.
Each week, participants ask the same residents three questions:
  • Is there clean water available in your settlement?
  • Were the toilets cleaned in the last seven days?
  • Was waste collected in your settlement in the last seven days?
IBP South Africa consolidates the answers and disseminates a weekly press release to bring problem areas to the attention of the relevant city agency. When cities are unable to respond, we will engage with the national body charged with coordinating the COVID-19 response."

From Nigeria, OluTimehin Adegbeye of “the Correspondent” reflects on:
“Why social distancing won’t work for us”
This represents millions of families who can only start buying or making meals when the primary breadwinner closes from work on any given day. For such people, the possibility of catching a previously unheard-of illness is a far less dangerous one than the knowledge that not having anything to eat is always a sunrise away."

Have a nice weekend
nils


nils carstensen
Local to Global Protection
E-mail: nic@...





Short updates and links on community action to covid-19

nils carstensen
 

Dear all,

Sorry for a few days silence my end - but did take a few days of with family over Easter.

From correspondence with Darare/IREMO in Kenya, I'm copying below a short update:

"In Kenya reported cases of corona virus are 189, 7 death, 7 recoveries. We are affected by lockdown of major town and shortage of food and essential is already felt. Food prices is shooting and this will likely affect the most vulnerable households. Basic prevention and protective kits are virtually absent in rural environment. At the moment, through Indigenous Right abd Resiurce Mgt Org-IREMO, roving community/Palc facilitators are disseminating the dangers of the virus and precautionary measures for people to stay safe through palc volunteers- commonly known as shepherds. The messages are translated to the local language people understand."

From Illegal, Mindanao in the Phillipines, Nanette/ECOWEB reports that ECOWEB and other NGOs (and importantly social media) advocacy towards the government is having some impact in terms of social inclusion in its response. Nanette also describes how:
"So many of our Overseas Filipino Workers and seafarers are now returning home without jobs waiting for them here apart from being stigmatized due to COVID-19 cases of some returning workers. The lockdown resulted to temporary stoppage of companies and retrenchments of workers that hurt more the micro and smaller businesses resulting to plummeting of our economy. Our government projected a 40% Debt to GDP ratio after COVID-19 and zero if not negative GDP growth for the year.  Suffering much now are the urban poor and informal workers in the urban areas where hunger is somehow creating distress and dissent making home quarantine a challenge especially for the daily wage earners and the hand-to-mouth informal dwellers. Many are saying while they fear COVID-19 but they worry more of having to sleep with an empty stomachs. Even the producing farmers and fisherfolks have suffered a lot from difficulty of access to market and for lack of access to transport services as public transport being stopped. Life for the IDPs who are still struggling to recover from the impact of previous disasters just become harder.

Access to limited health services is also difficult for the poor and more vulnerable. The limited test kits for COVID were only made available to the severe and those holding power and in authority and their families that aroused much public outcry. Thanks to social media this entitlement action of those in power have become subject to public criticisms. With a number of high officials been infected, access to limited tests became more difficult.....

Now we are pushing for more testing targeted in the slum areas esp in Manila where a number of COVID cases are now reported. We have also lobbied for quarantine areas and living support for those infected poor, vulnerable and marginalized. Access to proper information was also expressed by those in more remote areas without access to mainstream and social media. Proliferation of fake news and false information is also an issue. Access to hygiene and sanitation is also a challenge esp for the poor especially those without access to water. But access to food has been a priority concern expressed by many in the survey we have conducted."
(Nanette - I do hope you forgive me for shortened your original message a bit for this purpose!)

From Brazil the Guarduian newspaper reports how community action in some of the poorest favelas is trying to make up for the failure of action by the Bolsonaro government: 'We're abandoned to our own luck': coronavirus menaces Brazil's favelas - https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2020/apr/14/were-abandoned-to-our-own-luck-coronavirus-menaces-brazils-favelas?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
Good friends have also shared some interesting links to networks of community groups responding to Covid-19 in both the US and the UK. Not surprising but still interesting to see how - despite obviously different contexts - many of the risks, challenges and vulnerabilities - as well as attempts to find partial solutions - echo across the world:
In the US - find the resource library for self-help of the Mutual Aid Disaster Relief network here: https://mutualaiddisasterrelief.org/resources/
In the UK - learn about the Covid mutual aid network here: https://covidmutualaid.org  - and for instance a crowd funding platform for support to people in the UK in need of food parcels because of Covid-19: https://www.crowdfunder.co.uk/communities-together-covid-19

Please do keep sharing your own experiences and examples of community responses.
Greetings
nils

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